All posts by ASC

International Flights

Arriving in: Boston (Boston Logan International)

 

Original DestinationAirlinesDeparture AirportDirect Flight?
UK – LondonBritish AirwaysLondon LHRAvailable
DeltaLondon LHRAvailable
NorwegianLondon LGWAvailable
Virgin AtlanticLondon LHRAvailable
Spain – MadridAir EuropaMadrid MADAvailable
IberiaMadrid MADAvailable
France – ParisAir FranceParis CDGAvailable
American AirlinesParis CDGAvailable
DeltaParis CDGAvailable
Italy, RomeAlitaliaRome FCOAvailable
Germany – MunichLufthansaMunich MUCAvailable
Turkey – IstanbulTurkish AirlinesIstanbul ISTAvailable
China – ShanghaiHainanShanghai PVGAvailable
China – BeijingHainanBeijing PEKAvailable
Mexico – Mexico CityAeromexicoMexico City MEXAvailable

 

Arriving in: Denver (Denver International Airport)

 

Original DestinationAirlinesDeparture AirportDirect Flight?
UK – LondonBritish AirwaysLondon LHRAvailable
Germany – MunichLufthansaMunich MUCAvailable
Mexico – Mexico CityUnitedMexico City MEXAvailable
VolarisMexico City MEXAvailable

 

Arriving in: Newark (Newark Liberty International Airport)

 

Original DestinationAirlinesDeparture AirportDirect Flight?
UK – LondonBritish AirwaysLondon LHRAvailable
United (Lufthansa, Finnair, Iberia, Austrian Airlines)London LHRAvailable
Virgin AtlanticLondon LHRAvailable
Spain – MadridUnited AirlinesMadrid MADAvailable
France – ParisBritish AirwaysParis ORYAvailable
DeltaParis CDGAvailable
UnitedParis CDGAvailable
Italy, RomeUnitedRome FCOAvailable
Italy – MilanUnitedMilan MXPAvailable
Germany – MunichLufthansaMunich MUCAvailable
UnitedMunich MUCAvailable
China – ShanghaiUnitedShanghai PVGAvailable
China – BeijingUnitedBeijing PEKAvailable
Mexico – Mexico CityUnitedMexico City MEXAvailable

 

Arriving in: New York (John F. Kennedy International Airport)

 

Original DestinationAirlinesDeparture AirportDirect Flight?
UK – LondonAmerican AirlinesLondon LHRAvailable
British AirwaysLondon LHR/LGWAvailable
DeltaLondon LHRAvailable
NorwegianLondon LGWAvailable
Virgin AtlanticLondon LHRAvailable
Spain – MadridAir EuropaMadrid MADAvailable
American AirlinesMadrid MADAvailable
DeltaMadrid MADAvailable
IberiaMadrid MADAvailable
France – ParisAir FranceParis CDGAvailable
American AirlinesParis CDGAvailable
DeltaParis CDGAvailable
NorwegianParis CDGAvailable
Italy, RomeAmerican AirlinesRome FCOAvailable
AlitaliaRome FCOAvailable
DeltaRome FCOAvailable
Italy – MilanAlitaliaMilan MXPAvailable
American AirlinesMilan MXPAvailable
DeltaMilan MXPAvailable
EmiratesMilan MXPAvailable
Germany – MunichLufthansaMunich MUCAvailable
Turkey – IstanbulTurkish AirlinesIstanbul ISTAvailable
China – ShanghaiChina EasternShanghai PVGAvailable
China – BeijingAir ChinaBeijing PEKAvailable
Mexico – Mexico CityAeromexicoMexico City MEXAvailable
DeltaMexico City MEXAvailable
InterjetMexico City MEXAvailable
VolarisMexico City MEXAvailable

 

Arriving in: Washington, D.C. (Washington Dulles IAD)

 

Original DestinationAirlinesDeparture AirportDirect Flight?
UK – LondonBritish AirwaysLondon LHRAvailable
UnitedLondon LHRAvailable
Spain – MadridUnitedMadrid MADAvailable
France – ParisAir FranceParis CDGAvailable
UnitedParis CDGAvailable
Italy, RomeUnitedRome FCOAvailable
Germany – MunichLufthansaMunich MUCAvailable
UnitedMunich MUCAvailable
Turkey – IstanbulTurkish AirlinesIstanbul ISTAvailable
China – BeijingAir ChinaBeijing PEKAvailable
UnitedBeijing PEKAvailable
Mexico – Mexico CityAeromexicoMexico City MEXAvailable
UnitedMexico City MEXAvailable

 

 

Homesickness at Camp

Missing home and family is completely natural for children. In fact, it can be considered a *good* thing, as it means your kids have a great family back at home! The good thing is, it’s possible to miss home AND have fun at camp in the same time. Plus there are plenty of things to do to help reduce the amount of time your child feels homesick.

Summer camp staff are trained in working with children and helping them to deal with missing their family. It is common that the first letters you receive may indicate some homesickness or sadness. Ninety-five percent of campers experience a short adjustment period during the first few days of camp. Soon, campers get caught up in the excitement of new friends, activities, and camping adventures. Your support of this normal process is critical to your son or daughter’s success.

The good news is, when children arrive at camp with a repertoire of coping strategies and some practice time away from home under their belts, they are ready for those normal feelings of homesickness. Sure, they’ll miss home, but they’ll know exactly what to think and do when it bothers them. Best of all, their counselors and directors will be there to help. Nothing boosts children’s self-esteem quite like overcoming a bout of homesickness and learning how good they are at controlling the amount of fun they have. Camp truly is a classroom for life lessons.

What can YOU do to help with your child’s adjustment to camp?

How can you help your child adjust to being away from home?

  •  Start while your child is still at home and help them be proud of being independent and ready for camp. Review information the camp provides prior to the summer – online videos, camp tours, photos, information packets – and reinforce his excitement/interest about camp.
  •  Please do not tell your child that they can come home or that you will pick them up if they are homesick—it sets them up for failure instead of success.
  •  Practice overnights with family or friends to help first time campers get used to being away.
  •  Letters are important!!! Send upbeat, cheerful letters that focus on the fun your child is having. Two to three letters each week is plenty, since too many letters can actually make a well-adjusted camper homesick.


What should you write about? In your emails to camp, it is best not to dwell too much on what your child is missing at home or how much you miss them, as this can promote homesickness. Sharing news of what everyone is doing is fine, but it is also suggested that you encourage your child to do their best at camp, try new activities, enjoy his trips, etc.

If your child complains of some situation that is upsetting to them, by all means acknowledge that when you write back; then focus on some positive aspect of their personality and tell them that you’re confident they’ll work things out.

Most of all, it is important to communicate with your child prior to the summer so that they know it is completely normal to have feelings of homesickness. The key is for them to remember that they can miss their family and still have a great time at camp!

How long should my child attend camp?

Early on in your search for a summer camp, you will need to determine what length of stay is right for your child.  By the age of 9 or 10, many kids are ready for an experience that will challenge them and provide growth opportunities by being away from home for an extended amount of time (anywhere from 2 to 7 weeks). Believe it or not, it’s often harder for parents to part ways for this long, whereas kids are so busy at camp having fun, being active, and making new friends that the time flies by. The personal growth that is achieved at longer overnight camps is unparalleled – by living and playing day in and day out within a close-knit community, your child will grow in their independence and self-confidence through their achievements at camp and the relationships they will build.

We highly recommend international campers attend camp for a minimum of 2 weeks. By staying for at least 2 weeks, a camper can truly get in the mindset of adjusting to camp life. It is very normal for campers, whether American or international, to experience a modest amount of homesickness when they initially arrive at camp. Yet if the camper is staying for at least 2 weeks, they have a much higher chance of working through this homesick and enjoying their time at camp. Additionally, your child will get past any tiredness from jet lag and still have a significant amount of time left to enjoy cmap. One aspect of the 2-week experience to consider is that there are more changing dynamics within the cabin groups, as the campers are coming and going more frequently throughout the summer. Depending on the session and the cabin group, the camper may be with other campers who arrived at camp at the same time as them, and in other situations they may be joining a cabin group where some campers have already been at camp together. This is a question to discuss with the camp director of the camp you are considering.

Looking at a longer option, a 3 or 4 week session length is truly ideal for international kids attending summer camp. By attending a longer camp session, your son or daughter will be with other campers who arrived at the same time as them, and have a longer time to settle in, adjust, and grow at camp. Not only will they get past their homesickness within the first few days of camp, but they will also have a several weeks left to truly settle into the routine of camp. The growth in friendships and confidence your child will experience are achieved through being away from home for that extended time. They will be go through the ups and downs of day to day living with their close friends, and learn how to navigate those challenging moments and strong friendships. Additionally, they will have ample time to experience all the activities that camp has to offer, and to achieve some improvement in skills in those activity areas. Finally, instead of feeling like they are simply spending a few fun weeks away from home, they will grow to feel that camp IS their new home!

Finally, there are some camps that offer a 7-week session. For the international camper who has had experience being away from home in the past and is excited about attending camp, this is definitely a great option to consider. All of the benefits of a 3 or 4 week camp apply to the experience a camper has during a 7 week session, but to an even greater extent! When your child is at camp for 7 weeks, they will return home with even more significant skill development in the activities they participate in throughout the summer. On top of that, the social growth they experience is truly unique – the friendships formed are even more substantive, their conflict resolution skills truly are put to the test and are stronger, and their confidence and sense of accomplishment gained from being at camp for 7 weeks is unparalleled.

With all these options to consider for session length, it is important for parent and kids to talk through what the best option is. Be open to hearing about different lengths of sessions, but also be realistic about what is the best fit for your family. And as always, we are here to answer questions and help you navigate through this decision-making process!

Face-to-face interaction at camp

In our technology heavy culture, face-to-face interactions are become the exception.  This article (NY Times) articulates how just a couple days away from screens at camp help children connect to each other.

A Happy Camper

This summer, 10 million children are enjoying time at camp — half at one of the more than 2,400 accredited by the American Camp Association.

Self-Determination at Summer Camp

Parents spend a lot of time trying to motivate kids. We use chore charts, checklists, reminders and rewards to get them to feed the dog, clean their rooms and complete schoolwork. But these techniques don’t change behavior long-term. Real motivation must come from within.

Sleepaway camp gives kids a tech break

(CNN) – While my kids mainline Instagram and feverishly text, update and Snapchat with friends, I count down the days until they go off the grid and the tech detox begins. This withdrawal from the sticky web of social media can’t happen without intervention, and what I mean by intervention is sleepaway camp.

Should I Be Sending My Children to Camp?

Some six million children in the United States are preparing psychologically to go away to sleepaway camp. Whether these departing children are camp veterans or nervous rookies, they are mentally rehearsing being away from mom and dad, their comfortable beds, their pets, favorite meals and, of course, their beloved iPhones, Facebook and video games.